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Cristina H. Amon received her M.S. and Sc.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She joined Carnegie Mellon University in 1988 where she is the Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering. She has received numerous awards for research and education including the ASEE George Westinghouse Award in 1997, SWE Distinguished Engineering Educator in 1999, ASME Gustus L. Larson Memorial Award in 2000, ASEE Ralph Coats Roe Award in 2002, and ASME Electronics and Photonics Packaging Division Clock Award in 2003, and EPPD Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Engineering and Science of Thermal Management of Electronics in 2004. She has contributed eleven book chapters, one McGraw-Hill Custom Textbook, and more than 200 refereed articles in the education and research literature. Cristina Amon has served as chair of the ASME HTD K-16 Committee on Electronics Cooling, general chair of ITherm 2002, and executive member of the ASME Electronic and Photonic Packaging Division, and is the chair of AAAS Engineering. Her editorship roles have included the ASME J. of Heat Transfer, IEEE Transactions on Components and Packaging Technology, and Heat and Mass Transfer. She is a member of NAE and fellow of ASME, AAAS, ASEE and IEEE.
Contact information: camon@cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-3551.

 

Randall Feenstra is a Professor in the Department of Physics at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his B.Ap.Sc. degree in Engineering Physics from the University of British Columbia in 1978, and his Ph.D. degree in Applied Physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1982. His research interests are in the areas of atomic structure and electronic spectroscopy of semiconductor materials and heterostructures, growth of semiconductor thin films by molecular beam epitaxy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and of the American Vacuum Society, and recipient of a senior research award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.
Contact information: feenstra@cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-6961.

 

David W. Greve received the B.S. degree in Engineering Physics from Lehigh University in 1972. Subsequently, he received the M.S. degree in Physics from Rutgers University and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Lehigh University. After graduation, he worked at Philips Research Laboratories, Sunnyvale, and, in 1982, he joined the Electrical Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University, where he is now Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He holds courtesy appointments in the Department of Physics and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.
Contact information: dg07@andrew.cmu.edu; Phone – 412.268-3707.

 

Myung S. Jhon is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon. He received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Chicago. He has served as a visiting professor at a number of institutions, including Department of Energy Laboratories; the University of California, Berkeley; IBM Research Center; and the Naval Research Laboratory.He is a Fellow of the Korean Academy of Science and Technology, and has served on the advisory committee of the Korean National Program for Tera-level nanodevices, as well as chairing the advisory board and being a lead organizer for the U.S.-Korea Nanotechnology Forum. He has contributed over 400 refereed publications in the areas of computational methods, information storage systems, nanotechnology, statistical mechanics, fluid and solid mechanics, interfacial dynamics, polymer engineering, rheology, and tribology. He is a dedicated to the educational process, and has served as an ABET evaluator. He has won a number of teaching and research awards that include the Ladd, Teare, Ryan, Dowd, and Li awards. While on leave from Carnegie Mellon, he served as the CEO and President of Doosan DND, a manufacturer of industrial equipment for organic light-emitting devices and chemical-mechanical polishing.
Contact information: mj3a@andrew.cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-2233.

 

John Kitchin has been an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University since 2006. He received his B.S. in Chemistry from North Carolina State University in Raleigh, North Carolina, and his M.S. in Materials Science and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Delaware in Newark, Delaware. His general areas of research are in the use of electrocatalysis for energy-related applications such as fuel cells and carbon dioxide capture/utilization. He uses combinations of experimental and computational research to design new alloy electrocatalysts with improved properties for those applications.
Contact information: jkitchin@cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-7803.

 

Tomasz Kowalewski is Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Carnegie Mellon. He received his M.S. degree from Lodz Polytechnic in Poland and his Ph.D. from Polish Academy of Sciences. Dr. Kowalewski’s current research interests include physical chemistry of macromolecules with the emphasis on macromolecular self-assembly, soft condensed matter and proximal probe techniques. His interdisciplinary pursuits in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnonology involve nanostructure-properties relationships in semiconducting polymers, nanostructured carbons derived from well-defined block copolymers and stimulus-responsive polymer brushes and gels.
Contact information: tomek@andrew.cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-5927.

 

Professor Kumta is currently a Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Biomedical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He obtained his Bachelor of Technology in Metallurgical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, India in 1984. He then obtained his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Arizona in 1987 and 1990, respectively. He joined the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University in 1990 as an assistant professor, and was promoted to full professor with tenure in 1999. Professor Kumta’s main research interests are in the synthesis, structure and properties of nanostructured materials for electrochemical, electronic, optical, mineralized tissue engineering and non-viral gene delivery applications. Professor Kumta is the recipient of the NSF Research Initiation Award (RIA). He has given more than 50 invited presentations, and is the author and co-author of more than 140 refereed publications. He is a member of the American Ceramic Society, Materials Research Society and the Electrochemical Society. He is currently the Editor of Materials Science and Engineering, B, Solid-State Materials for Advanced Technology, an international journal by Elsevier.
Contact information: kumta@cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-8739.

 

David N. Lambeth has been a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University since 1989. He received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO in 1969, and his Ph.D. degree in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1973. From 1973 to 1989, he worked and managed in industry at the Eastman Kodak Laboratories and at Control Data Corporation. His research interests are in the areas of solid state physics, thin film materials, devices, physical and chemical sensors and transducers, MEMS, optical devices, energy conversion, magnetism, magnetic materials, and data storage. He is the inventor on approximately 30 patents, some of which have become commercial products. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
Contact information: lambeth@ece.cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-3674.

 

Gregory V. Lowry is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and has been at Carnegie Mellon since 2001. He received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering
from the University of California at Davis, his M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, and his Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Stanford University. His general area of research is environmental nanotechnologies including nanoparticle characterization, elucidating the reactions they promote, and their fate, transport and toxicity in the environment. Dr. Lowry’s research group currently investigates the use of novel surface coatings to enhance the mobility of zerovalent iron and metal-oxide nanoparticles used in the subsurface for aquifer restoration and that promote adsorption of nanoparticles to the contaminant-water interface. He is active in the CMU chapter of Sigma XI.
Contact information: glowry@cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-2948.

 

Krzysztof Matyjaszewski is Professor of Natural Sciences in the Department of Chemistry and Director of the Center for Macromolecular Engineering at Carnegie Mellon. He joined the faculty in 1985 and served as Head of Chemistry Department in 1994-1998. Dr. Matyjaszewski received his B.S./M.S. degrees from the Moscow State Polytechnic University. He completed his Ph.D. studies at the Polish Academy of Sciences. His nanoscience and nanotechnology interests are in the synthesis of segmented copolymers and hybrid materials with precisely controlled architecture, and their use for various advanced applications including optoelectronics and biomedical areas. Professor Matyjaszewski is a member of the National Academy of Engineering; Polish Academy of Sciences; and a Fellow of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry and the American Chemical Society, Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering. He received honorary degrees from the University of Ghent, Belgium and the Russian Academy of Sciences.
Contact information: matyjaszewski@cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-3209.

 

Sara Majetich is a Professor in the Physics Department at Carnegie Mellon University. She received her A.B. degree in Chemistry at Princeton University, the M.S. degree in Physical Chemistry from Columbia University, and Ph.D. in Solid State Physics from the University of Georgia. Following postdoctoral work at Cornell University, she joined the faculty at Carnegie Mellon in 1990. Her research interests are in magnetic nanoparticles and nanostructures, including both materials preparation and characterization, for potential applications in data storage media, biomedicine, high frequency inductors, permanent magnets, and magnetic refrigeration. She has authored over 100 papers, and has received a National Young Investigator Award from the U.S. National Science Foundation for her work. She is a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Magnetics Society for 2007.
Contact information: sara@cmu.edu; Phone – (412) 268-3105.

 

Richard McCullough is Dean of the Mellon College of Science (2001 to present) and Professor of Chemistry at Carnegie Mellon University. Originally from Dallas, Texas, McCullough earned his B.S. degree in chemistry in 1982 from the University of Texas at Dallas. In 1988, he completed his Ph.D. in organic chemistry at Johns Hopkins University and went on to work as a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University. He joined Carnegie Mellon University in 1990, and was Head of Chemistry from 1998 to 2001. Dr. McCullough is widely recognized in the scientific community as a leader in research on conductive polymers, and has developed new synthetic methods that produce self-assembled and regioregular, highly-conductive, organized polythiophenes. He has also developed a number of conjugated polymer sensors, nanoelectronic assembled and electrical-conductive nanowires, and multifunctional nanoelectronic polymers. His work in organic materials chemistry spans many fields and primarily focuses on the synthesis of advanced manufacturing materials with special conductive qualities, devices developed from molecular wires, as well as new polymers for use in plastic transistors, solar cells and printable displays. As Dean, he has continued to build new strength in key areas of biotechnology. In 2001, McCullough’s conducting polymers formed the basis of a Carnegie Mellon spinout company, Plextronics, Inc. Plextronics’ technology was named Frost and Sullivan’s 2005 Emerging Technology of the Year in Printed Electronics. A company founder, McCullough is the Chief Scientific Officer of Plextronics, Inc.
Contact information: rm5g@andrew.cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-3136.

 

Lisa Porter is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering at Carnegie Mellon. She joined the faculty in 1997 after a postdoctoral position at North Carolina State University. She received her B.S. degree from Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., and her Ph.D. from North Carolina State University in Raleigh, N.C. Her research activities are focused on the analysis of chemistry, microstructure, and electrical properties of electronically-functional interfaces. She is interested in a range of materials including wide band-gap semiconductors, carbon-based semiconductors and nanostructures, organic semiconductors, metal-semiconductor interfaces, dielectric-semiconductor interfaces, and thin films. Her group is also interested in a range of applications, especially renewable energy technologies and chemical sensing, and associated electronic devices such as solar cells and field-effect transistors (FETs). She is corresponding secretary for the Carnegie Mellon Chapter of Sigma Xi, and is a member of the Materials Research Society, the Society of Women Engineers, TMS, Phi Kappa Phi, the Cornell Engineering Alumni Association, and the American Association of University Women.
Contact information: lporter@andrew.cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-4047.

 

Gregory S. Rohrer is the W.W. Mullins Professor and Head of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) at Carnegie Mellon. He joined the faculty in 1990 as an Assistant Professor after a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his B.A. in Physics from Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania and his Ph.D. in MSE from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Rohrer studies the structure and properties of surfaces and interfaces using scanning probe and electron optical microscopic analysis tools. Microscopic analysis is routinely conducted at the nanoscale, where is it possible to investigate the mechanisms that relate an interface’s structure to its properties. Current work is focused on developing structure/property relationships for water photolysis catalysts; measuring anisotropic surface and grain boundary properties; and the influence of grain boundary distributions on macroscopic properties.
Contact information: gr20@andrew.cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-2696.

 

Gordon Rule has been a Professor of Chemistry at Carnegie Mellon University since 1996. He received his undergraduate degree in biochemistry from the University of Waterloo, Canada; then completed his M.S. degree at Penn State in Biophysics (1981). He received his Ph.D. at Carnegie Mellon University from the department of Biological Sciences in 1986. Dr. Rule’s postdoctoral work was at Stanford University under H. M. McConnell in the area of physical biochemistry in 1988. He then joined the faculty of Biochemistry at the University of Virginia School of Medicine. He remained there until he moved to Carnegie Mellon in 1996. Dr. Rule’s current research interests are in the application of nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to the study of molecular dynamics and recognition in biological systems, principally enzymes. Dr. Rule also has been active in computational biology where he has developed software tools for NMR resonance assignments and, in collaboration with M. Erdmann in computer science, algorithms for protein structure analysis. Most recently, in collaboration with Dr. D. Lambeth in ECE, he has developed a strong interest in the use of biological materials in the development of sensors and other nanodevices.
Contact information: rule@andrew.cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-1839.

 

Paul A. Salvador is an Associate Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) at Carnegie Mellon. He joined the faculty in 1999 as an Assistant Professor after a postdoctoral fellowship at the Laboratoire CRISMAT of the Ecole Nationale Superiere d’Ingenieurs de Caen in Caen, France. He received his B.S.E. in MSE from the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, and his Ph.D. in MSE from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. His general areas of research are in the thin film deposition of complex oxides and nitrides, the design of novel materials, and structure-property relations in functional ceramics. His nanoscience and nanotechnology interests are natural extensions of his general research interests, since thin film synthesis can be used to create unique nanoscale architectures in the materials that allow for improved functionalities. Specifically, he is interested in the nanoscale effects of interfaces on the properties of data storage media; hard coatings for machining applications; dielectric films for electronics; and mixed conductors for electrochemical technologies.
Contact information: paul7@andrew.cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-2702.

 

Sridhar Seetharaman has been an Associate Professor in the MSE Department at Carnegie Mellon since 2005. He received his undergraduate degree from the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a thesis topic in the area of electrochemical reactions at SOFC’s anodes. Subsequently, he was a postdoctoral associate at Imperial College, London. Since 2005, he has been the associate director of the NSF sponsored Industry-University collaboration Center for Iron and Steelmaking Research, which focuses on the high-temperature physical chemistry of steel processing. His research interests are in the area of high-temperature reaction kinetics and thermodynamics. He has authored over 90 papers and three book chapters. He is currently the principal editor for the journal AIST Transactions, and is a member of the board of review for Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. He has been awarded a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation and the Friedrich Willhelm Bessel Research Prize from the Humboldt Foundation. In addition, he was awarded the Marcus A. Grossman Young Author Award for the best paper in Metallurgical and Materials Transactions in the year 2002, and the 2000 Charles H. Herty Best Paper Award by the Iron and Steel Society.
Contact information: sridhars@andrew.cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-2675.

 

Metin Sitti has been an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon since 2002, and he also has courtesy appointments in the Robotics Institute, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Biomedical Engineering. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Bogazici the University in Istanbul, Turkey, and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Tokyo. His general areas of research are in micro/nanoscale robotics. His nanoscience and nanotechnology interests are on biologically inspired micro/nano-fibrillar adhesives, hybrid micro/nano-robots, nanomanufacturing, and nanomanipulation. Dr. Sitti is the chair of the IEEE Nanotechnology Council, Nanorobotics and Nanomanufacturing Technical Committee, and co-chair of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, Rapid Prototyping in Robotics and Automation Technical Committee, and a member of IEEE and ASME.
Contact information: sitti@cmu.edu; Phone – 412.268.3632.

 

David S. Sholl is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, with a courtesy appointment in Materials Science and Engineering. Professor Sholl’s research focuses on materials whose macroscopic dynamic and thermodynamic properties are strongly influenced by their atomic-scale structure. Much of this research involves applying computational techniques such as molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulations, and quantum chemistry methods to materials of interest. Specific current interests include nanoporous materials for gas separations applications, metal hydrides for the hydrogen purification and storage, and nanostructured metal surfaces for separation of chiral compounds.
Contact information: sholl@andrew.cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-4207.

 

Marek Skowronski is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) at Carnegie Mellon. He joined the faculty in 1988 as an Assistant Professor after a working as a visiting scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his Ph.D. in Solid State Physics from Warsaw University, in Warsaw, Poland. His general research interests cover most aspects of electronic materials including: crystal growth of semiconductors; deposition of epitaxial films of metals, semiconductors and dielectrics; processing-induced defects; and degradation phenomena in electronic devices. His nanoscience and nanotechnology interests are natural extensions of his general research interests; electronics structures of materials are strongly altered in nanoscale architectures, and nanoscale epitaxial films promise improvements in device functionalities. Whether it is concerned with nanoscale, microscale, or bulk materials, Prof. Skowronski’s research projects attempt to balance twin goals: the demonstration of novel approaches to processing and the development of fundamental understanding of materials and processes.
Contact information: mareks@cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-2710.

 

Robert Tilton is Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He obtained the B.Ch.E. from the University of Delaware in 1986, and the M.S. and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Stanford University in 1987 and 1991, respectively. Prior to starting at Carnegie Mellon in 1992, he was a postdoctoral scientist in Physical Chemistry at the Royal Institute of Technology and the Institute for Surface Chemistry in Stockholm, Sweden. His research interests are in complex fluids engineering, colloid science and interface science. Particular areas of emphasis include fundamental investigations of protein/surface interactions, protein modifications for sustained release drug delivery, adsorption from complex mixtures of polymers and surfactants, engineered nanoparticles for biomedical and environmental technologies, surfactant carriers for pulmonary drug delivery, and electrokinetic phenomena for biosensor and bioMEMS technologies. He currently serves as vice chair of the American Chemical Society Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry.
Contact information: tilton@andrew.cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-1159.

 

Elias Towe is currently the Albert and Ethel Grobstein Professor at Carnegie Mellon. He teaches in the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering. He joined the faculty at Carnegie Mellon in 2001. Professor Towe was educated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he received his S.B., S.M., and Ph.D. degrees from the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, the AAAS, the American Physical Society, and the Optical Society of America. His primary research interests are in photonics and sensors. He studies nanometer-scale phenomena with potential applications in photonic devices and sensing systems.
Contact information: towe@cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-8091.

 

S. C. Yao is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering specializing in fluid mechanics and heat-mass transfer research. He has published over 150 papers in 28 years. During the last decade, he focused his research on MEMS and thermal fluids. This has led to his development of micro-structured surfaces for heat transfer enhancement, micro-nozzles to create micro sprays, passive micro-bubble separators, and various micro-fluidic elements for electronic cooling and micro fuel cell applications. He has also been studying micro-structured surfaces for the control of liquid and gas motion utilizing capillary effects in fluids. Dr. Yao received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1974. He was elected a Life Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1988. He has served as chairman of the Fire and Combustion Committee and is a member of the Long Range Planning Committee of the ASME Heat Transfer Division. In 2000, he served as Program Chair of the National Heat Transfer Conference.
Contact information: sy0d@andrew.cmu.edu; Phone – 412-268-2508.


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